May 29, 2015

Been Thirty




So. I've been thirty. For roughly... two weeks. But not quite.

Thirty.

Spffffffffffffffffffffttttttttttttttttttttshhhhhhhhhh.

Phew.

And you know what?

It feels good.

But.

I'm not going to lie. I was dreading my 30th. I moped. I wined. I cried. I curled up in a ball and hollered for my mom. She didn't come though. I don't think she could hear me at 20 miles away.... but it was worth a shot.

A good friend and I were texting not long before my birthday. We were making plans for the weekend. I said something along the lines of, "Let's go do something fun. I am going to be thirty. Eek!"

She replied back with some words that I will hold close to my heart for the rest of my life.

30 is only a number, Kel. You will be just fine. You are successful, admirable and so thoughtful. Just adds more wisdom to your years.... It's all about how comfortable you feel with who you are in life.

Well, I am glad I have her fooled! ;)

But seriously. She is right.

It truly is about being comfortable with who you are.

You hear the saying, 'The best years of your life' a lot. Some may refer to those years as being in high school. Maybe those college years. Some may refer to those years at retirement. Some as newlyweds.

But really, how can you define the best years of your life when you don't know what's yet to come?

I mean, honestly.

We don't know what tomorrow will bring. Heck, we don't know what next year will bring.

Life. Is full of surprises.

So, to sit back and say you've already experienced the best years of your life is, well, crap. (Sorry for using the word, mom. My brother and I learned it on the school bus when I was in like 3rd grade and I remember getting in trouble for using it.)

I challenge you.

Whether you're 3. 30. or 93.

Go out and have the best fricken years of your life.

Every. Single. Day. For the rest of your life.

May 12, 2015

Hope


We have been in the midst of planting field corn and soybeans here on the farm. I always fall into a different state of mind when we plant crops, have crops in the ground and harvest the crops. My passion for agriculture tends to grow more and more each spring.

Along with my hope.

From April to November, there's a lot of hope.

When we want in the fields, we hope it doesn't rain.

Once we get in the fields, we hope the equipment runs smoothly.

Once seed is in the ground, we hope it does rain and we hope it doesn't frost (or snow).

We hope it rains enough and not too much.

When it storms, we hope it doesn't hail or we hope the wind doesn't blow too hard.

We hope it's warm but not too warm.

During harvest, we hope the rain holds off until all the crops are out.

We continue to hope the equipment once again runs smoothly.

We hope for safety.

We hope that we are doing all the right things so that our land is fertile for next year and years to come.

We hope the commodity prices are in our favor so we can pay operation bills so we can break even and maybe even make a little extra.

We hope that someday, we will have the opportunity to rent more ground.

We hope that we would be making our ancestors proud.

Hope, in agriculture, is just as important as soil, water and air.

Hope is more important than money.

You can buy the best equipment, the most ground and operate a nice grain facility but if you lack hope, you're going to fall.

Hope in agriculture is something that money can't buy. It's something you're born with. Hope lies deep within your passion and love for the industry.

Hope is what will carry you through the hard times and it will carry you through the good times.

It's not something that can be put in a will, or forced upon someone, but hope is something that can pass through generation to generation.

Hope is a choice but it's a choice your heart makes; not your mind.

I wake up every morning and I see the hope in my husband's eyes. It's what drives my hope.

Hope allows us to dream. It allows us to follow our passion. It allows us to believe in ourselves.

Without hope, we wouldn't have soil, we'd have dirt.

We wouldn't have a passion, we'd have a job.

Hope. 

It's a word you can't see but you can feel it.

Even when everything seems to be going wrong, there is always hope to make everything right.

The only thing I don't have to hope for is hoping we are where we're suppose to be.

May 9, 2015

Mothers and Tough Love


As you know, Mother's Day is this Sunday. Tomorrow, actually.

This Mother's Day is pretty special. It's the weekend before my 30th birthday. Yes, the BIG 30.

And I was the first born.

SO.

We will be celebrating my mother's 30th Mother's Day. I do realize that I was born after mothers day so it only would technically be her 29th but I am hoping Mother's Day was celebrated 30 years ago on the account of my incubation.

It's not very often someone can say they've been doing the same thing for 30 years. Heck, I've played every sport imaginable, changed from hobby to hobby, held many different best friends, changed my major in college 5 times and have worked enough different jobs to count on 10 fingers and maybe even 5 toes in the last 30 years. I really can't say that I have steadily done the same thing for 30 years other than brushing my teeth.

My mom has been a mom for 30 years and not once has she quit, thrown in the towel or said she didn't want to be a mom anymore.

I'm sure there are times that she wanted to give up......... but one thing I've always noticed about my mom is that she doesn't give up.