Jun 23, 2015

Homestead Versus Industry


I was recently asked to help out a friend with some photography for a Father's Day gift. This friend's father, uncle, brother and cousin operate a relatively large grain farm in my neighborhood. I've grown particularly fond of this family through their modesty, honesty and hard work. I've recognized their good character since I started dating my husband years ago before I even lived here.


Just like any industry, it's easy to lose touch of your roots as you grow and become successful. 

But, you don't see that when you visit the Ron Clauson farm.



During my visit, I was focused on those roots. 

I was focused on family, true love and a passion.

At first I struggled with my vision as I went back through the pictures I took from my visit. My photos lacked the big yellow combine, rows of corn and soybeans, pretty blue tractors, grain legs, the big farm shop and the many things you think of when envisioning a modern grain operation.


But you see, I wasn't there to take pictures of those things. I wasn't capturing the industry.

I was capturing family memories.

While I captured this family's memories, I found myself reminiscing my own similar childhood memories. The smell of the cow pasture, the sound of the creek running, the cool air as we descended into the barn and the voice of a father passionate about taking care of his family, land and livestock. 

I was reminded how lucky I was to have grown up in the country, raised by loving parents that held the same dreams and passions that I once will hold as an adult.


Sure, I was excited to work on my photography skills and flattered to be a part of this project but I never thought I would walk away with an even deeper sense of appreciation for the life I've lived and an even deeper appreciation for the family farmer.

Living the dream for a real farmer is not about how many acres they farm, how many head of livestock they raise, the age of their equipment or the big shop. It's about going home to a loving family, a home-cooked meal, helping children care for their fair animals, splashing in the creek on a hot day, helping a neighbor in need and providing a life for his family that you can't get anywhere else. 

It's about building a homestead. A place to look back at and call home.



I once heard a saying, "Home is where your barn is."

I can believe that.

All photos are Copyright and owned by the author of Old Blue Silo and the client. Please link back and credit to any used.

4 comments:

  1. Very insightful and true, Kelly! Sounds like you had an inspiring visit and you took some gorgeous pictures.

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